CEIBA

Counseling Center

Corona Virus Outbreak can be stressful


The outbreak of corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may be stressful for people. 

Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children. 

Coping with stress will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger.


Stress during an infectious disease outbreak can include

• Fear and worry about your own health and the health of your loved ones

• Changes in sleep or eating patterns

• Difficulty sleeping or concentrating

• Worsening of chronic health problems

• Worsening of mental health conditions

• Increased use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs


Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations

How you respond to the outbreak can depend on your background, 

the things that make you different from other people, and the community you live in.


People who may respond more strongly to the stress of a crisis include

• Older people and people with chronic diseases who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19

• Children and teens

• People who are helping with the response to COVID-19, like doctors, other health care providers, and first responders 

• People who have mental health conditions including problems with substance use


Take care of yourself and your community

Taking care of yourself, your friends, and your family can help you cope with stress. 

Helping others cope with their stress can also make your community stronger.


Ways to cope with stress

• Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media. 

   Hearing about the pandemic repeatedly can be upsetting.

• Take care of your body. 

    ◦Take deep breaths, stretch, or meditate external.

    ◦Try to eat healthy, well-balanced meals.

    ◦Exercise regularly, get plenty of sleep.

    ◦Avoid alcohol and drugs external.

• Make time to unwind. Try to do some other activities you enjoy.

• Connect with others. Talk with people you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.


How to Protect Yourself & Others


Get Vaccinated and stay up to date on your COVID-19 vaccines

  • COVID-19 vaccines are effective at preventing you from getting sick. COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalizations, and death.
  • Getting vaccinated is the best way to slow the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.
  • CDC recommends that everyone who is eligible stay up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines, including people with weakened immune systems.

Wear a mask

  • Everyone ages 2 years and older should properly wear a well-fitting mask indoors in public in areas where the COVID-19 Community Level is high, regardless of vaccination status.
  • Wear a mask with the best fit, protection, and comfort for you.
  • If you are in an area with a high COVID-19 Community Level and are ages 2 or older, wear a mask indoors in public.
  • If you are sick and need to be around others, or are caring for someone who has COVID-19, wear a mask.
  • If you are at increased risk for severe illness, or live with or spend time with someone at higher risk, speak to your healthcare provider about wearing a mask at medium COVID-19 Community Levels.
  • People who have a condition or are taking medications that weaken their immune system may not be fully protected even if they are up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines. They should talk to their healthcare providers about what additional precautions may be necessary.
  • For more information, see COVID-19 Vaccines for Moderately or Severely Immunocompromised People
  • Everyone aged 2 years or older—including passengers and workers— should properly wear a well-fitting mask or respirator in indoor areas of public transportation (such as airplanes, trains, buses, ferries) and transportation hubs (such as airports, stations, and seaports), especially in locations that are crowded or poorly ventilated such as airport jetways.

Stay 6 feet away from others

  • Inside your home: Avoid close contact with people who are sick, if possible. If possible, maintain 6 feet between the person who is sick and other household members. If you are taking care of someone who is sick, make sure you properly wear a well-fitting mask and follow other steps to protect yourself.
  • Indoors in public: If you are not up to date on COVID-19 vaccines, stay at least 6 feet away from other people, especially if you are at higher risk of getting very sick with COVID-19.

Avoid poorly ventilated spaces and crowds

  • If indoors, bring in fresh air by opening windows and doors, if possible.
  • If you are at increased risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, avoid crowded places and indoor spaces that do not have fresh air from the outdoors.

Test to prevent spread to others

  • You can choose from many different types of tests.
  • Tests for SARS-CoV-2(the virus that causes COVID-19) tell you if you have an infection at the time of the test. This type of test is called a viral test because it looks for viral infection.
  • Regardless of the test type you select, a positive test result means that you have an infection and should isolate and inform your close contacts to avoid spreading disease to others.
  • Over-the-counter self-tests are viral tests that can be used at home or anywhere, are easy to use, and produce rapid results. Anyone can use self-tests, regardless of their vaccination status or whether they have symptoms.
  • COVID-19 self-tests are one of many risk-reduction measures, along with vaccination, masking, and physical distancing, that protect you and others by reducing the chances of spreading COVID-19

Wash your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • It’s especially important to wash your hands:

          -  Before eating or preparing food

          -  Before touching your face

          -  After using the restroom

          -  After leaving a public place

          -  After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing

          -  After handling your mask

          -  After changing a diaper

          -  After caring for someone sick

          -  After touching animals or pets

  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • If you are wearing a mask: You can cough or sneeze into your mask. Put on a new, clean mask as soon as possible and wash your hands.
  • If you are not wearing a mask:
  • Always cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, or use the inside of your elbow and do not spit.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Clean and disinfect

  • Clean high touch surfaces regularly or as needed and after you have visitors in your home. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If someone is sick or has tested positive for COVID-19, disinfect frequently touched surfaces.
  • Use a household disinfectant product from EPA’s List N: Disinfectants for Coronavirus (COVID-19)external icon according to manufacturer’s labeled directions.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them using detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

Monitor your health daily

  • Be alert for symptoms:
  • Watch for fever, cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Take your temperature if symptoms develop.
  • Don’t take your temperature within 30 minutes of exercising or after taking medications that could lower your temperature, like acetaminophen.
  • Follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.
  • Monitoring symptoms is especially important if you are running errands, going into the office or workplace, and in settings where it may be difficult to keep a physical distance of 6 feet.

Follow recommendations for quarantine

  • If you come into close contact with someone with COVID-19: follow CDC’s recommendations for quarantine

Follow recommendations for isolation

  • If you test positive for COVID-19 or have symptoms: follow CDC’s recommendations for isolation.


Need help? Know someone who does?

If you, or someone you care about, are feeling overwhelmed with emotions 

like sadness, depression, or anxiety, or feel like you want to harm yourself or others

Call 911

Visit the Disaster Distress Helpline, call 1-800-985-5990

Text Talk With Us to 66746

Visit the National Domestic Violence Hotline, call 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224

Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention